Activities


Del Mar College Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Events covering variety of issues and their impact

From Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, communities across the nation observe and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, recognizing the diversity, innumerable contributions and influence Hispanics provided to shape this country. In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month this year, Del Mar College’s Mexican-American Studies program and the DMC chapter of the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education present the following events:

Thursday, September 15
Lecture Titled “The History and Politics of Immigration Policy: From the Lamp Beside the Golden Door to the Great, Great Wall”

The inscription on the Statue of Liberty has served as a beacon of hope and welcome to successive waves of immigrants throughout American history. This is a nation of immigrants, yet, there have been considerable discrepancies between the ideal of a lamp lifted to the “wretched refuse” of the world and the harsh reality of official immigration policy. Today, we are more likely to hear about the building of walls than we are of “a lamp beside the golden door.” In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, Del Mar College professor of political science Renato Ramirez will present an overview of the history of immigration to the United States and how government policy has evolved in response to changing public attitudes to factors such as ethnicity, race, religion and the economy. Colleague and associate professor of political science Dr. Adrian Clark will examine immigration policy during the Obama years and the politics of immigration in recent presidential elections.

  • Thursday, Sept. 15, 1 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College East, Naples at Kosar off Staples, free.
  • For more information, contact Elizabeth Flores at 698-1218 or eflores@delmar.edu.

Friday, September 23
Del Mar College Viking Book Club Monthly Meeting

DMC Viking Book Club meeting participants will discuss How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez in September as part of Hispanic Heritage Month. A sensitive story of four sisters who must adjust to life in America after having to flee from the Dominican Republic is told through a series of episodes beginning in adulthood when their lives are shaped by U. S. mores and then moving backward to their wealthy childhood on the island. Adapting to American life is difficult, causing embarrassment when friends meet their parents, anger as they are bullied and called “spics” and confusing after summer trips to the family compound in the Dominican Republic. Interconnected vignettes of family life, resilience and love are skillfully intertwined to offer a perspective on immigration and families as well as a look at America through Hispanic eyes. Club meetings are open to the public.

  • Friday, Sept. 23, 1:30 p.m., Room 402, White Library, Del Mar College East, Naples off Kosar at Staples, free.
  • For more information, contact Benita Flores-Muñoz at 698-2385 or benitaflores@delmar.edu.

Tuesday, September 27
Lecture Titled “Addressing the Forgotten Dead: New Research on Violence Against the Mexican and Mexican-American Populations of the United States”

Del Mar College’s Dr. James Klein, associate professor of history, and Renato Ramirez, chair of the Social Sciences Department and professor of political science, will provide a presentation on William D. Carrigan and Clive Webb’s “Forgotten Dead: Mob Violence against Mexicans in the United States, 1848-1928.” Published in 2014, this publication is one of the first to comprehensively chronicle violence against the Mexican and Mexican-American populations during the settlement of the American West. The publication also links seemingly unrelated events—including attacks on Mexican miners in 1850s California, mob violence against the Albuquerque Hispanic population in the 1880s and attacks on the South Texas Tejano population in the early twentieth century—through themes of ethnic prejudice and economic competition. Viewed in light of recent studies on the social construction of whiteness in American society, this work will force historians to reconsider their approach to the development of the American west.

  • Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College East, Naples off Kosar at Staples, free.
  • For more information, contact Elizabeth Flores at 698-1218 or eflores@delmar.edu.

Thursday, October 6
Lecture Titled “Effective Use of Interpreters: Forming Partnerships Towards Improved Communication and Outcomes”

Limited English Proficiency (LEP) clients require effective interpreters as well as service providers who understand the importance of accurate interpretation and its impact on health and health care. As such, service providers must comprehend interpretation styles and establish partnerships with certified interpreters to provide appropriate and effective service. Del Mar College’s Dr. Olivia Lopez, adjunct social work instructor, will share the important and necessary role interpreters play in the health care field.

  • Thursday, Oct. 6, 1 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College East, Naples at Kosar off Staples, free.
  • For more information, contact Elizabeth Flores at 698-1218 or eflores@delmar.edu.

Wednesday, October 12
Lecture Titled “Making Tacos in Space: José Jiménez and the Evolutionary History of Hispanics in American Spaceflight, 1958-Present”

A billboard with a young Hispanic boy and the phrase “Future Rocket Scientist” greets drivers along the Dr. Hector P. Garcia Highway in Corpus Christi. Despite the sign’s message of limitless opportunities for Americans in science and engineering, Hispanics have remained largely invisible in these fields—or even ridiculed—within the public discourse of American “rocket science” or this presentation’s focuses on spaceflight. For instance, after an appearance on the Ed Sullivan show in the early 1960s, Hungarian immigrant and comedian Bill Dana introduced his long-running iconic character, José Jiménez, as a dim-witted fictitious astronaut from Bolivia. Perhaps a product of Cold War xenophobic racism, Americans conflated the character’s fictitious background and assumed Jiménez was Mexican. Members of the Mexican-American community were outraged. Del Mar College assistant professor of history Dr. Erinn McComb will present some historical context to the billboard, Jiménez, and Hispanics in the Space Race as well as trace origins of Dana’s character and reaction from the American public and the Mexican-American community.

  • Wednesday, Oct. 12, 1 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College East, Naples at Kosar off Staples, free.
  • For more information, contact Elizabeth Flores at 698-1218 or eflores@delmar.edu.

-DMC-

 

 

 
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