MLA Works Cited List

 

What is a MLA Works Cited List?

When using outside sources in writing a paper, the writer must document, or cite, every borrowed word, idea, or fact. The writer does this by creating a Works Cited list, using the MLA (Modern Language Association) format. The list contains all the works, both print and non-print, that the writer cited within the text. It appears at the end of the paper, with each entry double-spaced and in alphabetical order.

 

Four Common Entries:

1.    Book

The three main pieces of information needed for this entry are Author’s Name. Title of Book. Publication Information.

 

Example:

            Robinson, Patricia A. Fundamentals of Technical Writing. Boston: Houghton,

 

1985. Print.

 

Sometimes, more information may be needed to lead the reader to the source:

 

1. Author’s name

2. Title of a part of the book (in quotation marks)

3. Title of the book (in italics)

4. Name of the editor, translator, or compiler

5. Edition used

6. Number(s) of the volume(s) used

7. Place of publication, name of publisher, and date of publication

8. Page numbers; if not available use n. pag.

9. Supplementary bibliographic information and annotation

10. Medium of publication

11. Name of the series

 

 

2.    Articles in periodicals (newspapers, magazines, or scholarly journals)

The three main pieces of information for this entry are Author’s Name. “Title of the Article. Publication Information.

 

Example:

Andersen, Kurt. “Beat the Press: Fear and Self-loathing in the Newsroom.” The

 

New Yorker 22 Sept. 1997: 58+. Print.

 

At times, more information may be needed; the order appears as follows:

 

1. Author’s name

2. Title of the article (in quotation marks)

3. Name of the periodical (in italics)

4. Series number or name

5. Volume number

6. Issue number

7. Date of publication; if not available use n.d.

8. Page numbers; if not available use n. pag.

9. Supplementary information

10. Medium of publication

 

3.   Online source or World Wide Web site

In addition to the three main pieces of information, this type of entry requires a date of access. The order appears as follows:

 

1.    Author’s name (if known)

2.    Title of document (in quotation marks)

3.    Title of complete work (in italics)

4.    Publisher/sponsor; if not available, use N.p.

5.    Date of publication or last revision; if not available use n.d.

6.    Medium of publication

7.    Date of access

 

Example:

Standler, Ronald. “Plagiarism in Colleges in USA.” Dr. Ronald B. Standler : Attorney in Massachusetts and Consultant.  N.p. 14 Apr. 2001.  Web. 19 May 2006.

 

At times, more information may be needed, depending on the type of online site you are citing. Consult an English handbook for appropriate MLA formatting.

 

4.  Online Subscription Service

      For an online subscription service the print version information and online information is needed.  

      The order appears as follows:

 

  1. Author’s name (if known)
  2. Title of document (in quotation marks)
  3. Publication information for any print version
  4. Name of journal (in italics)
  5. Volume and issue
  6. Date of publication; if not available use n.d.
  7. Page(s) number(s); if not available use n. pag.
  8. Title of database (in italics)
  9. Medium of publication
  10. Date accessed

 

Example:

Miller, Alison L., Brenda L. Volling, and Nancy L. McElwain. “Sibling Jealousy in a Traidic Context

with Mothers and Fathers.” Social Development 9.4 (2000): 433-457.  Academic Search Complete. Web.  2 Feb. 2008.

 

 

Remember:

The MLA format of the Works Cited List is very precise. You may refer to a printed resource like Joseph Gibaldi’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. For help and examples, access the MLA web site at http://www.mla.org or go to http://www.delmar.edu/engl/labs/1301/assign/mla/examples.htm.