SRT Logo 180
Blue
orange
yellow

 

 

Audio for Video

In many way, there is a blurring of audio and video; students should know both aspects.

The Audio for Video class at Del Mar College explores how audio (and audio-like procedures) intersect the world of the visual. In particular we look at the four audio elements that occur in most video and film productions, how they take place, and good techniques for making them effective. The class is almost split in two with the second half of the semester reversing the roles with a "Video for Audio" spin. By understanding both aspects of a completed production, students will have a better overall knowledge and respect for the features and limitations of both the aural and visual.

The first project is short but sweet; take an exisiting video file with no audio and make it work. No commercial sounds allowed, all must be created from scratch. Here are two radically different takes using the same base sounds:

Transformer 1 Transformer 2

Thanks to Ruben Estrada and Saul Fuentes for their interpretations

Below is a good hybrid between audio and video. The sounds you hear were recorded with the video (via a standard CCD video camera). Each student sat behind the drumset and struck each drum of the set-up with their left and right hands. There were also 'funny' poses made during the capture. The video capture is pretty bland, but but editing each strike into its own clip and editing them together in a frame based music format, the student creates a drum groove with a stop animation look. The students also added basic filters, scale, and other effects into the visual stew. One of the interesting aspects that came out if this year's cohort was the inclusion of my voice (acting as video director) in the edits. Usually that material is edited out, but they decided to use it - and it made a great addition! The video below is a composite of seven student projects which results in yet another creation.

The 2008 Drum Video Compilation (Quicktime 7)